Wicked Zombies

YOU ONLY LIVE ONCE...MAYBE TWICE!

Okay going to post the original announcement on this and the description of this virus but as far as all the updates you are gonna have to click the link to go to MZACF because it is just way to much to copy over.

http://www.myzombieapocalypsechosenfew.com/related-to-cdc-post.html

This is Velma and this is just now hitting the wires. I will literally be taking it right from the reports for the most part. Thought it was to important to wait till I could do my own write up of it. So everyone spread it around.

*Giggle Wink*
Velma


CDC: 10,000 at risk of hantavirus in Yosemite outbreak

About 10,000 people who stayed in tent cabins at Yosemite National Park over the summer may be at risk for hantavirus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Friday in a health advisory.   "People who stayed in the tents between June 10 and Aug. 24 may be at risk of developing (hantavirus) in the next six weeks," the CDC said in the release.  Earlier, two more Yosemite National Park visitors were found with a mouse-borne virus blamed for the deaths of two people, bringing the total number of infections to six, state health officials said.
Picture
The new discoveries were made during the agency's investigation into cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome at the famed park, California Department of Public Health Anita Gore spokeswoman said.  The infections spurred park officials to close 91 tent cabins at Curry Village in Yosemite Valley, where five of the six infections occurred. Gore said one of the infected people may have been in another area of the park.  "Our investigation is trying to determine which area of the park that person visited," she said.  Over the past three weeks, two people have died of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome after staying in cabins at Curry Village in Yosemite Valley.  Park officials said the double-walled design of the cabins that were closed Tuesday made it easy for mice to nest between the walls. The disease is carried in the feces, urine and saliva of deer mice and other rodents.  The illness begins as flu-like symptoms, including including headache, fever, muscle ache, shortness of breath and cough. Initial symptoms may appear up to six weeks after exposure and can lead to severe breathing difficulties and death.    Although there is no cure for hantavirus, treatment after early detection through blood tests can save lives. The virus, which has never been known to be transmitted between humans, kills 38 percent of those it infects.  "The earlier it's caught and supportive care is given, the better the survival rate," said Dr. Vicki Kramer, chief of vector-borne diseases at the state Public Health Department.  Dr. Charles Chiu, an infectious disease specialist at the University of California, San Francisco, said he made a habit of airing out his tent-cabin before occupying it as a precaution against possible virus-carrying dust particles when he stayed in Curry Village a few years ago.  But even Chiu said he was surprised to learn that a hantavirus had killed two people and stricken others who slept in the same structures this summer.  "It wasn't something even I had thought of at the time," Chiu, who studies hantavirus, told Reuters.  Five of the people who fell ill are known to have stayed in the tent cabins in June or July, and warnings have gone out to visitors who stayed in Curry Village in June, July or August.  The hantavirus outbreak occurred despite efforts by park officials to step up protection efforts last April. A 2010 report from the state health department warned park officials that rodent inspection efforts should be increased after a visitor to the Tuolumne Meadows area of the park fell ill.  The new hantavirus policy, enacted April 25, was designed to provide a safe place, "free from recognized hazards that may cause serious physical harm or death."  It came after the state report revealed that 18 percent of mice trapped for testing at various locations around the park were positive for hantavirus. Advertise | AdChoices  "Inspections for rodent infestations and appropriate exclusion efforts, particularly for buildings where people sleep, should be enhanced," it said.  Melanie Norall of Palo Alto, California, is monitoring her 8-year-old daughter's every sniffle. They stayed in a cabin outside Yosemite's north entrance at the end of July and awoke to mice scurrying and eating nuts out of their luggage.  In 2009, the park installed the 91 new, higher-end cabins to replace some that had been closed or damaged after parts of Curry Village, which sits below the 3,000-foot Glacier Point promontory, were determined to be in a rock-fall hazard zone.  The new cabins have canvas exteriors and drywall or plywood inside, with insulation in between. Park officials found this week when they tried to shore up some of the cabins that mice had built nests in the walls.  The deer mice most prone to carrying the virus can squeeze through holes just one-quarter-inch in diameter. They are distinguished from solid-colored house mice by their white bellies and gray and brown bodies.  The park sent warning emails and letters Wednesday to another 1,000 people who stayed in tent cabins, after officials found that a computer glitch had stopped the notices from going out with the original 1,700 warnings Monday. The warning says anyone with flu-like symptoms or respiratory problems should seek immediate medical attention.  In 2011, half of the 24 U.S. hantavirus cases ended in death. But since 1993, when the virus first was identified, the average death rate is 36.39 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control.  The vast majority of hantavirus victims are young and middle-age adults, Chiu said, probably because they are mostly likely to engage in activities that would readily expose them, such as chopping and carrying fire wood or sweeping the floors.  "The message should not be you should stop camping. The important thing is general awareness of this disease and to avoid wild rodents in general," Chiu said.

The break down of the Virus

Picture

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is a severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in humans caused by infection with a hantavirus.  Anyone who comes into contact with rodents that carry hantavirus is at risk of HPS. Rodent infestation in and around the home remains the primary risk for hantavirus exposure. Even healthy individuals are at risk for HPS infection if exposed to the virus.  To date, no cases of HPS have been reported in the United States in which the virus was transmitted from one person to another. In fact, in a study of health care workers who were exposed to either patients or specimens infected with related types of hantaviruses (which cause a different disease in humans), none of the workers showed evidence of infection or illness.


HantavirusHantavirus pulmonary syndrome; Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndromeLast reviewed: March 11, 2011.

Hantavirus is a life-threatning disease spread to humans by rodents that has symptoms similar to influenza.

Causes, incidence, and risk factorsHantavirus is carried by rodents, especially deer mice. The virus is found in their urine and feces, but it does not make the animal sick.

It is believed that humans can get sick with this virus if they come in contact with contaminated dust from mice nests or droppings. You may come in contact with such dust when cleaning homes, sheds, or other enclosed areas that have been empty for a long time.

Hantavirus does not spread between humans.

Rodents carrying the hantavirus have been found in many U.S. national parks. Campers and hikers may be more likely to catch the disease than most people. This is because they pitch tents on the forest floor and lay their sleeping bags down in musty cabins.

However, only a couple of cases have been directly linked to camping or hiking. Most people who are exposed to the virus have come in contact with rodent droppings in their own homes.

SymptomsThe early symptoms of hantavirus disease are similar to the flu and include:

  • Chills

  • Fever

  • Muscle aches

People with hantavirus may begin to feel better for a very short amount of time, but within 1-2 days, it becomes hard to breathe. The disease gets worse quickly. Symptoms include:

  • Dry cough

  • General ill feeling (malaise)

  • Headache

  • Nausea and vomiting

  • Shortness of breath

Signs and testsThe health care provider will perform a physical exam. This may reveal:

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

  • Kidney failure

  • Low blood pressure (hypotension)

  • Low blood oxygen levels, which cause the skin to turn a blue color

The following tests may be done:

  • Blood tests to check for signs of hantavirus

  • Complete blood count (CBC)

  • Complete metabolic panel

  • Kidney and liver function tests

  • X-ray of the chest

TreatmentPeople with hantavirus are admitted to the hospital, often to the intensive care unit (ICU).

Treatments will include:

  • Oxygen

  • Breathing tube or breathing machine in severe cases

  • A medication called ribavirin to treat kidney-related problems and reduce the risk of death

There is no effective treatment for hantavirus infection involving the lungs.

Expectations (prognosis)Hantavirus is a serious infection that gets worse quickly. Lung failure can occur and may lead to death. Even with aggressive treatment, more than half of people who have this disease in their lungs die.

ComplicationsComplications of hantavirus may include:

  • Kidney failure

  • Heart and lung failure

These complications can lead to death.

Calling your health care provider

Call your health care provider if you develop flu-like symptoms after you come in contact with rodent droppings or rodent urine, or dust that is contaminated with these substances.

PreventionAvoid exposure to rodent urine and droppings.

  • When hiking and camping, pitch tents in areas where there are no rodent droppings.

  • Avoid rodent dens.

  • Drink disinfected water.

  • Sleep on a ground cover and pad.

  • Keep your home clean. Clear out potential nesting sites and clean your kitchen.

If you must work in an area where contact with rodent urine or feces is possible, follow these recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  1. When opening an unused cabin, shed, or other building, open all the doors and windows, leave the building, and allow the space to air out for 30 minutes.

  2. Return to the building and spray the surfaces, carpet, and other areas with a disinfectant. Leave the building for another 30 minutes.

  3. Spray mouse nests and droppings with a 10% solution of chlorine bleach or similar disinfectant. Allow it to sit for 30 minutes. Using rubber gloves, place the materials in plastic bags. Seal the bags and throw them in the trash or an incinerator. Dispose of gloves and cleaning materials in the same way.

  4. Wash all potentially contaminated hard surfaces with a bleach or disinfectant solution. Avoid vacuuming until the area has been thoroughly decontaminated. Then, vacuum the first few times with enough ventilation. Surgical masks may provide some protection.

References
  1. Bell M. Viral hemorrhagic fevers. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2007:chap 404.
  2. Peters CJ. California encephalitis, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, and bunyavirid hemorrhagic fevers. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Douglas and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Disease. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009:chap 166.

Views: 64

Wicked Books

Our Sponsors


View more gifts at Zazzle.

WICKED ZOMBIES members appreciation.

The WICKED member who has unyielding Dedication and Loyalty to the KOMRADZ:

Priest

The WICKED member who has Outstanding Constancy:

Jessie W. Garrett III

The WICKED member who Contributed the most Original Zombie Discussions and Replies:

saint.357

They will receive a WICKED ZOMBIES Goody Box with Wicked Treats.

Blog Posts

Random Nighmare

random nightmare 2020:
i lay under a blanket facing downhill with my machine gun. the blanket is to mask our heat signature. some of them hunt by body heat.
another soldier is…
Continue

Posted by Priest on September 16, 2020 at 9:14am

© 2020   Created by Komrad Venessa Wicked☭.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Groups Forum Videos Photos Blogs Invite You Friends My Page Main Page